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Kyleigh's Law Cut Crashes by 9%, Study Says

Researchers claim 1,624 crashes prevented as a result of Graduated License Program in first year.

After it’s first full year as a New Jersey law, the graduated driver’s license program has yielded a 9-percent drop in police-reported crash rates, according to a recent study published by the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

The Graduated Driver’s License program, also known as Kyleigh’s Law, named for Long Valley teen Kyleigh D’allesio who, along with peer Tanner Birch was killed in a car crash in 2006 in Washington Township, was signed into law May 1, 2010.

Along with the 9-percent decrease in police-reported crashes among drivers under 21 years of age, the study shows there was a 14-percent increase in the citation rate from May 2010 to May 2011–the one-year time frame analyzed by a group of researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Kyleigh’s Law requires young drivers to affix decals on their license plates. The legislation also enforces the amount of passengers allowed in a vehicle at one time and imposes curfews on probationary motorists.

The study states an “estimated 1,624 young probationary drivers for whom a crash was prevented” as a result of the law.

Researchers concluded that “the law is positively affecting probationary drivers’ safety.”

To read the full report, go here.

For related Patch coverage on the topic, see:

NJ Appeals Court Upholds Kyleigh's Law

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Alyssa Siegel October 26, 2012 at 01:38 PM
"Along with the 9-percent decrease in police-reported crashes among drivers under 21 years of age, the study shows there was a 14-percent increase in the citation rate from May 2010 to May 2011–the one-year time frame analyzed by a group of researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia" Interesting how their numbers reflect under 21 year olds, when Kyleigh's law primarily affects under 18 year olds with a probationary license. How accurate can these statistics be? The law changed the driving hours and use of red decal for those probationary drivers. How is grouping full licensed drivers between 18-21 with those 17years old an accurate assessment of how the law is working??
Danny Blaney January 11, 2013 at 01:52 AM
Not to mention almost no one actually enforces the decals and pretty much no one uses them. So any change is certainly has nothing to do with kyleighs law.

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